Women’s Bargaining Power and Children’s Schooling Outcomes: Evidence From Ghana

Women’s Bargaining Power and Children’s Schooling Outcomes: Evidence From Ghana

By Clifford Afoakwah, Xin Deng, Ilke Onur

HIGHLIGHTS

• Slow school progression caused by late enrolment and grade repetition is a problem worldwide, especially in developing countries.

• This study examines the impact of women’s intrahousehold bargaining power on children’s schooling outcomes in Ghana.

• Increased women’s bargaining power has no effect on the timing of school enrollment but reduces the chances of grade repetition and how many times the same grade is repeated.

• Girls benefit more from their mothers’ bargaining power compared to boys.

• Women’s bargaining power has a larger impact on the education of firstborn children than on subsequent children.

• Policies aimed at empowering women will improve children’s schooling outcomes.

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